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History

1960s (62)
1970s (92)
1980s (169)
Namibia (101)
1950s (3)
1990s (89)
pic 8004. Demonstration against Fluor UK

Demonstrators outside the London headquarters of Fluor UK on 10 March 1980. Fluor was the British subsidiary of a US multinational that was bidding for a contract to build a new oil-from-coal plant for the South African state energy company SASOL. The picket was organised by End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA).

 
bom16. Boycott News No. 1

The Boycott Movement produced three issues of its broadsheet, Boycott News, early in 1960. The first issue printed an appeal by ANC President Chief Albert Luthuli for a boycott of South African goods. The appeal was also signed by Peter Brown, Chairman of the South African Liberal Party and GM Naicker, President of the South African Indian Congress. The broadsheet sold over 100,000 copies.

 
60s01. Programme of the Anti-Apartheid Committee

After the Sharpeville massacre on 21 March 1960 the Boycott Movement renamed itself the Anti-Apartheid Committee. Its draft programme proposed a ‘Shun Verwoerd’s South Africa’ campaign that took the radical step of moving from an individual boycott of South African goods to UN economic sanctions and the total isolation of South Africa.

 
pic8905. March against uranium imports from Namibia

Protesters in Southampton demonstrated against the import of uranium from Namibia through the city’s docks in February 1989. The protest was organised by Southampton AA Group and local supporters of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and the Green Party.

 
pic9305. ‘Making Hope a Reality’ conference

Archbishops Desmond Tutu and Trevor Huddleston at the ‘Making Hope a Reality’ conference held in London, 14–15 June 1993. The conference discussed post-apartheid solidarity and mapped out a new agenda of support for the people of Southern Africa. It was convened by Trevor Huddleston and the former President of Tanzania, Julius Nyerere, and organised by the AAM in co-operation with the UN Special Committee against Apartheid. The main speakers were Walter Sisulu and Desmond Tutu.

 
zim15. ‘Rhodesia or Zimbabwe?’

From 1973, as guerrilla warfare escalated within Zimbabwe, the Smith regime carried out secret hangings of its opponents and charged thousands of people with political offences. This leaflet highlighted the repression and stressed the continued responsibility of the British Labour government as the legal authority in Zimbabwe.

 
pic8514. AAM march for sanctions

The contingent from the Mangrove, All Saints Road, North Kensington, on their way to join the march for sanctions against South Africa on 2 November 1985. In the background is a banner from the Tabernacle Community Centre. 150,000 people marched from east, west and south London to Trafalgar Square on 2 November 1985 to demand British sanctions against South Africa. ANC President Oliver Tambo, SWAPO leader Shapua Kaukungua and US civil rights leader Jesse Jackson all called for a change of government policy. The march was the culmination of an intensive campaign that reached every part of Britain.

 
bom17. Boycott News No. 2

The Boycott Movement produced three issues of its broadsheet, Boycott News, early in 1960. The second issue reported on the progress of the boycott campaign after its launch at a national conference held on 17 January 1960. It printed messages of support from Labour Party leader Hugh Gaitskell and Liberal Party leader Jo Grimond.

 
pic8515. AAM march for sanctions

150,000 people marched from east, west and south London to Trafalgar Square on 2 November 1985 to demand British sanctions against South Africa. In the Square, ANC President Oliver Tambo, SWAPO leader Shapua Kaukungua and US civil rights leader Jesse Jackson all called for a change of government policy. In the picture is Ken Livingstone, Leader of the Greater London Council. The march was the culmination of an intensive campaign that reached every corner of Britain.

 
60s02. Emergency in South Africa

After the Sharpeville massacre on 21 March 1960 the apartheid government banned the African National Congress and Pan Africanist Congress and detained hundreds of anti-apartheid activists. This leaflet asked people in Britain to protest and boycott South African goods.

 
70s04. Action Against Apartheid?

After the cancellation of the Springbok cricket tour in May 1970 the Anti-Apartheid Movement stepped up its campaign to recruit new members. This leaflet publicised the AAM’s campaigns for a total boycott of South Africa and an arms embargo.

 
pic8908. ‘SWAPO will win’

In December 1988 South Africa signed the UN Plan for the Independence of Namibia, which led to the holding of free elections in November 1989. Church Action on Namibia marked 1 April 1989, the date set for the implementation of the plan, with a street theatre performance outside the South African Embassy showing British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher greeting South African President P W Botha.

 
pic9312. Mandela with Stephen Lawrence’s family

Nelson Mandela visited the family of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence on his visit to London in May 1993. Stephen was stabbed to death by a white racist gang when he was waiting at a bus stop in Eltham, south-east London, on 22 April.

 
zim16. ‘Rhodesia or Zimbabwe?’ conference

Leaflet advertising an AAM conference held in October 1975 to mark the tenth anniversary of UDI. The conference discussed the role of South Africa and Britain’s responsibility for Zimbabwe, and provided updates on the economic situation inside the country.

 
bom18. Boycott News No. 3

The Boycott Movement produced three issues of its broadsheet, Boycott News, early in 1960. The third issue was published soon after the Sharpeville massacre. It endorsed the ANC’s call for the imposition of UN economic sanctions against South Africa and reported on opinion polls showing that 25% of people in Britain boycotted South African goods during the March Month of Boycott. It announced that the Boycott Movement had reconstituted itself as the Anti-Apartheid Committee with a wide programme of anti-apartheid activity. 

 
tu39. From Apartheid to Democracy in South Africa

Report of a seminar on the role of British trade unions in post-apartheid solidarity. The report reprinted the address of keynote speaker Jay Naidoo, former General Secretary of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) and a Programme of Action for the British trade union movement.

 
pic8516. AAM march for sanctions

150,000 people marched from east, west and south London to Trafalgar Square on 2 November 1985 to demand British sanctions against South Africa. In the Square, ANC President Oliver Tambo, SWAPO leader Shapua Kaukungua and US civil rights leader Jesse Jackson all called for a change of government policy. The march was the culmination of an intensive campaign that reached every part of Britain.

 
60s03. ‘The Whole World is Angry’

Leaflet published soon after the Sharpeville massacre calling for a continuation of the boycott of South African goods. The reverse side reprints the list of South African goods on the leaflet distributed during the March Month of Boycott Action.

 
pic8911. Namibia emergency campaign, May 1989

In December 1988 South Africa signed the UN Plan for the Independence of Namibia, which led to the holding of free elections in November 1989. With the Namibia Support Committee, the AAM set up the Namibia Emergency Campaign (NEC) to mobilise British support for Namibian independence and solidarity with the South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO). On 13 May the NEC held a conference where 200 delegates were briefed by SWAPO Labour Secretary Jason Angula.

 
gov06. Letter from Abdul Minty to Harold Wilson

Letter to Prime Minister Harold Wilson about the operations of BOSS agents in the UK. The AAM asked the government to end all liaison between the British and South African intelligence services.

 
 
 
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