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1960s (62)
1970s (92)
1980s (169)
Namibia (101)
1950s (3)
1990s (89)
pic9006. Rally in Trafalgar Square

Over 20,000 demonstrators packed Trafalgar Square on 25 March 1990 in the first big anti-apartheid demonstration in Britain after the release of Nelson Mandela. Left to right: Abdul Minty, Rivonia trialist Andrew Mlangeni, AAM Chair Bob Hughes and AAM President Trevor Huddleston.

 
pic6008. Sharpeville massacre protest, 27 March 1960

 

Part of the 20,000-strong crowd in Trafalgar Square at the rally to protest against the massacre of 69 unarmed demonstrators at Sharpeville on 21 March. The rally was organised by the Labour Party. Speakers included African National Congress leader, Tennyson Makiwane, Labour’s Colonial Affairs spokesperson James Callaghan and Robert Willis from the TUC General Council. In the days following the massacre crowds gathered spontaneously outside South Africa House.

 
pic7605. Solidarity with Soweto students

Thousands of people marched through central London on 27 June 1976 to protest against the South African police massacre of school students in Soweto. The march was led by ANC members carrying a symbolic coffin. Right to left: ANC members John Matshikiza, Billy Nannan and Garth Strachan.

 
pic7906. Zimbabwe march and rally, November 1979

At the head of a march through central London on 11 November 1979 to demand there should be no agreement on Zimbabwe that fell short of genuine majority rule. In the photograph are Labour MPs Clare Short, Alex Lyon and AAM Chair Bob Hughes with Edson Zvobgo, Publicity Secretary of Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front. After lengthy negotiations, elections were held in February 1980. They were won by the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front under the leadership of Robert Mugabe.

 
Pic8204. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ demonstration

Anti-apartheid supporters from Waltham Forest, north-east London, at the demonstration in Trafalgar Square on 14 March 1982. The rally was the biggest anti-apartheid demonstration since Sharpeville in 1960. Speakers included ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo, representatives of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the TUC, asylum seekers campaigner Anwar Ditta and the only black member of the British Sports Council, Paul Stephenson. On the morning of the demonstration a bomb blast destroyed part of the ANC’s London office.

 
pic8430. Angola invasion protest

From the early 1980s young white South Africans who refused to do compulsory military service came to Britain and played an important part in anti-apartheid campaigns. In 1984 the apartheid government extended military conscription for whites. In this picture supporters of COSAWR are protesting against South Africa’s new military offensive against Angola in the winter of 1983/84.

 
pic9007. ‘Go Home, De Klerk’

AAM demonstrators lined the entrance to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s country residence, Chequers, when South African President F W de Klerk arrived there in July 1990.

 
pic6009. Boycott News, 1960

The Boycott Movement produced three issues of its broadsheet, Boycott News, early in 1960. The first issue sold over 100,000 copies and reprinted an appeal for an international boycott of South African goods by ANC President Chief Albert Luthuli. This anti-apartheid supporter was selling the broadsheet outside South Africa House.

 
pic7606. Soweto students in London, 1976

Leaders of the Soweto student uprising Tsietsi Mashinini, Selby Semela and Barney Makheatle in London after escaping from South Africa in 1976.

 
 
pic8205. ‘Southern Africa: The Time Choose’ demonstration

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference culminated in a 15,000-strong march and rally on 14 March 1982. The rally was the biggest anti-apartheid demonstration since Sharpeville in 1960. Speakers included ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo, representatives of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the TUC, asylum seekers campaigner Anwar Ditta and the only black member of the British Sports Council, Paul Stephenson. On the morning of the demonstration a bomb blast destroyed part of the ANC’s London office.

 
pic8816. Protest against visit by Jonas Savimbi

Jonas Savimbi, leader of the South African-backed Unita organisation in Angola, was met with widespread protests when he visited London in July 1988. An advertisement was placed in the Independent newspaper and demonstrators picketed the Royal Institute of International Affairs, which hosted a meeting for Savimbi. The British Foreign Office gave assurances that Savimbi would not be officially received.

 
pic9013. Oliver Tambo with AAM leaders

ANC president Oliver Tambo accepts a message of solidarity for the ANC’s consultative conference from AAM President Trevor Huddleston in December 1990. Also in the picture are the AAM’s Chair Bob Hughes MP and Executive Secretary Mike Terry.

 
pic7911. ‘No Tory Sell Out in Zimbabwe’

The AAM organised a mass march and rally in central London on 30 June 1979 to urge the newly elected Conservative government not to recognise the Muzorewa government in Zimbabwe.

 
pic7702. AAM march and rally, 6 March 1977

Trade union banners on a march to Trafalgar Square calling for an end to British arms sales to South Africa and a freeze on investment, 6 March 1977.

 
Pic8206. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ demonstration

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference culminated in a 15,000-strong march and rally on 14 March 1982. The rally in Trafalgar Square was the biggest anti-apartheid demonstration since Sharpeville in 1960. Speakers included ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo, representatives of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the TUC, asylum seekers campaigner Anwar Ditta and the only black member of the British Sports Council, Paul Stephenson. On the morning of the demonstration a bomb blast destroyed part of the ANC’s London office.

 
arm16. The Labour movement and the Southern African struggle

This memorandum showed how the Labour government elected in 1974 was failing to honour its election pledge to end military links with South Africa. It asked trade unionists and Labour Party members to press the government to end military co-operation and to take action on Zimbabwe and Namibia.

 
bom01. Launch of the Boycott Movement, 1959

Report of the meeting held in Holborn Hall on 26 June 1959 to launch a boycott of South African goods. The speakers were Julius Nyerere, then President of the Tanganyika Legislative Council, Kanyama Chiume from Nyasaland (later Malawi), ANC representative Tennyson Makiwane, Vella Pillay, representing the South African Indian Congress, and Rev. Michael Scott. The meeting was organised by the Committee of African Organisations. This report appeared in the July issue of the Transvaal Indian Congress Bulletin and is the only known contemporary account of the meeting.

 
pic9015. Nelson Mandela at Wembley

Nelson Mandela at the Wembley concert held on 16 April 1990.

 
pic6001. Boycott Movement march and rally, 28 February 1960

In March 1960 the newly formed South Africa Boycott Movement held a Month of Boycott Action. It was launched at a march from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square. At the head of the march were ANC leader Tennyson Makiwane, Trevor Huddleston, Labour Party Leader Hugh Gaitskell and Dennis Phombeah of the London-based Committee of African Organisations. During the month, local councils all over Britain banned South African goods and supporters distributed leaflets to shoppers calling for a boycott.

 
pic6010. Oliver Tambo and Trevor Huddleston

Oliver Tambo and Trevor Huddleston in London in 1960.

 
 
 
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