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History

1960s (62)
1970s (92)
1980s (169)
Namibia (101)
1950s (3)
1990s (89)
gov16. Letter from Margaret Thatcher to Abdul Minty

Letter from Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher commenting on the AAM’s memorandum of June 1980. She reiterated that the government had no standing in the case of Nelson Mandela, although she said his release would be ‘widely welcomed’. 

 
zim02. The Unholy Alliance

Leaflet produced for the AAM’s campaign to pressure the Labour government to impose stronger measures against the illegal Smith regime immediately after UDI. It showed how South Africa and Portugal were helping Rhodesia hold out against sanctions. The leaflet argued that the alliance of the three white minority regimes would lead to race war in Southern Africa.

 
tsh10. Mozambique A Luta Continua
 
bdg10. UN435 Free Namibia Now

In 1978 the UN Security Council passed Resolution 435 setting out a plan for transition to Namibian independence. After ten years of negotiations between the Western Contact Group of five UN Security Council members and South Africa, agreement was reached on implementation of the plan in December 1988. Namibia held democratic elections in November 1989 and celebrated its independence on 21 March 1990.

 
pic 8001. Anniversary of the Kassinga massacre

AAM supporters protested outside South Africa House in May 1980 on the second anniversary of the Kassinga massacre. They carried placards with the names of some of the 137 Namibians abducted from the Kassinga refugee camp in Angola by the South African Defence Force in May 1978. Over 600 Namibian refugees were massacred in the raid. Left to right: Labour MP Chris Mullin, Bishop Colin Winter and Labour MP Joan Lestor.

 
arm07. ‘Stop Arms for Apartheid’ rally

One of the first decisions of the Conservative government elected in June 1970 was to resume arms sales to South Africa. Campaigning against arms sales became the AAM’s top priority. This leaflet advertised an AAM demonstration on 25 October. 10,000 people marched up Whitehall to Trafalgar Square, led by a model of a Buccaneer bomber. Demonstrators also besieged the office of aircraft manufacturer Hawker Siddeley, where several were arrested.

 
pic8410. UDF leader in London

At a meeting at the Africa Centre in London on 24 May, United Democratic Front (UDF) leader Mohammed Valli Moosa brought greetings from the UDF to the AAM. He said the UDF opposed President P W Botha’s forthcoming trip to Britain in June. Valli Moosa’s visit was the start of close cooperation between the AAM and the UDF in the 1980s.

 
bom05. For and against the boycott, July 1959
 
Correspondence in a north London newspaper, the Finchley Press, 24 and 31 July 1959. Like the writer of one of these letters, opponents of the boycott often argued that it would hurt black workers. The Boycott Movement countered this by publicising an appeal for a boycott from ANC President Chief Albert Luthuli and other anti-apartheid leaders within South Africa.
 
pic9105. ‘Vote for Democracy’ campaign

The AAM launched its ‘Vote for Democracy’ campaign at the TUC Congress in Glasgow in September 1991. The campaign called for ‘one person one vote’ in response to the National Party’s constitutional proposals, which gave special voting rights to the white minority. In the photograph are AAM President Trevor Huddleston and railway workers’ union leader Jimmy Knapp.

 
gov17. Letter from the Anti-Apartheid Movement to Margaret Thatcher

Letter to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher calling on the British government to support UN mandatory economic sanctions against South Africa in response to South Africa’s invasion of Angola in 1981.

 
zim03. ‘March behind the student banner’

On 26 June 1966 a crowd estimated at between 3,000 and 5,000 people attended a rally in Trafalgar Square calling for majority rule in Rhodesia. This leaflet urged students to join the demonstration. At a press conference before the march the AAM released a Declaration on Rhodesia signed by 41 ‘eminent people’, including writers Brigid Brophy and Iris Murdoch, pianist Fou T’Song, naturalist Peter Scott and academics and trade unionists.

 
tsh11. Namibia 1990 history is made by the people
 
pic8005. ‘Hands off Namibian Uranium’

In the 1970s and 1980s Britain imported uranium from Rio Tinto Zinc’s Rossing mine in Namibia in contravention of UN resolutions. As part of a long-running campaign, on 8 November 1980 over 300 demonstrators marched to British Nuclear Fuels Springfields plant near Preston where the uranium was processed. They were led by trade union banners from Preston, Leeds and Merseyside and joined by trade unionists from all over the north of England. The demonstration was organised by the North-West Trade Union/AAM Liaison Committee and the Namibia Support Committee.

 
arm08. ‘We Say No to Arms to South Africa’

One of the first decisions of the Conservative government elected in June 1970 was to resume arms sales to South Africa. The AAM immediately appealed to people in Britain to oppose the decision. This leaflet publicised a 24-hour protest fast in Downing Street by former South African political prisoners. In 1971 a Gallup poll found that 71 per cent of people surveyed were opposed to arms sales.

 
pic8413. Demonstration against PW Botha, 1984

At least 50,000 people marched through London on 2 June 1984 to tell South African President P W Botha he was not welcome in Britain.The demonstration was the beginning of an upsurge of anti-apartheid action which gathered pace for the rest of the decade.  Botha met Prime Minister Thatcher at her country house Chequers, instead of Downing Street, because of the scale of the protest. In the photograph are Deputy Labour Leader Roy Hattersley (left) with AAM Chair Bob Hughes MP and Liberal MP Simon Hughes.

 
bom06. Finchley public meeting


Leaflet advertising a meeting organised by a local Boycott Committee in Finchley and Friern Barnet, north London on 18 February 1960. In the run-up to the March Month of Boycott meetings like this were held all over Britain. One of the first local boycott actions took place in Finchley on Saturday 11 July 1959, organised by the Committee of African Organisations and Finchley Labour Party.

 
pic9106. AAM Freedom Bus

The AAM converted its ‘Boycott Bandwagon’ into a ‘Freedom Bus’ after the release of Nelson Mandela and the opening of negotiations for a democratic constitution in South Africa. The bus was destroyed by arsonists in February 1992 and reduced to a burnt-out shell.

 
zim04. ‘Freedom for Rhodesia’ rally

On 26 June 1966 a crowd estimated at between 3,000 and 5,000 people joined a rally in Trafalgar Square to hear speakers, including British Council of Churches representative Rev. Bill Sargent, speaking on behalf of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Judy Todd, call for majority rule in Rhodesia. At a press conference before the march the AAM released a Declaration on Rhodesia signed by 41 ‘eminent people’, including writers Brigid Brophy and Iris Murdoch, pianist Fou T’Song, naturalist Peter Scott, and academics and trade unionists.

 
tsh12. Support the Frontline States: Trade against Apartheid
 
pic8006. ‘Hands off Namibian Uranium’

In the 1970s and 1980s Britain imported uranium from Rio Tinto Zinc’s Rossing mine in Namibia in contravention of UN resolutions. As part of a long-running campaign, on 8 November 1980 over 300 demonstrators marched to British Nuclear Fuels Springfields plant near Preston where the uranium was processed. They were led by trade union banners from Preston, Leeds and Merseyside and joined by unionists from all over the north of England. The demonstration was organized by the North-West Trade Union/AAM Liaison Committee and the Namibia Support Committee.

 
 
 
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