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las02. Sheffield and Southern Africa

n 1981 Sheffield District Council became the first British local authority to announce it would end all links with South Africa. This pamphlet reprinted the keynote speeches at a conference on the role of transnational corporations in South Africa held in Sheffield in 1982.

 
70s11. Partners in Crime

In July 1973 Portuguese dictator Marcelo Caetano visited London to mark the 600th anniversary of the Anglo-Portuguese Alliance. This pamphlet exposed how the British government and British business supported Portuguese colonialism in Africa. The End the Alliance campaign was a coordinating group set up by the AAM and the Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guine. It included the National Union of Students and the Labour and Liberal Parties.

 
pro24. Children & Apartheid

In September 1987 a conference in Harare heard testimony from children who had been tortured by the South African security forces. Over 200 health workers, lawyers, social workers and representatives of student, trade union, religious and women’s organisations from 45 countries met children living in South Africa and the frontline states. This pamphlet told some of the children’s stories and appealed for support for the Trevor Huddleston Children’s Fund.

 
fls15. Apartheid’s War Against Angola

Starting in 1975, South African forces repeatedly invaded Angola, destroying crops and infrastructure. One of their main aims was to depopulate southern Angola and stop guerrilla fighters from the South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO) crossing into northern Namibia. This pamphlet called on Western countries to pressure South Africa to reach agreement on the independence of Namibia.

 
fls16. South Africa’s Undeclared War Against Mozambique

From the early 1980s South Africa destabilised Mozambique by supporting the Mozambique National Resistance (MNR). The MNR killed villagers and attacked economic targets like the Beira-Zimbabwe railway line. South African commandos also mounted raids into Mozambique, killing ANC activists and Mozambican civilians. This pamphlet gives a detailed account of South Africa’s undeclared war. Shortly after it was published Mozambique and South Africa signed the Nkomati Accord, but the apartheid government reneged on its pledge to stop arming the MNR. 

 
fls18. South Africa’s Record of International Terrorism

South Africa repeatedly raided neighbouring states to abduct or murder political exiles. This pamphlet documented incursions going back to the early 1960s. It showed how the South African security forces had violated the borders of seven independent states. The pamphlet called on the international community to take action against South Africa for violating international law. 

 
fls19. Southern Africa, Apartheid and Sanctions

The keynote speaker at the AAM 1987 annual general meeting was Simba Makoni, Executive Secretary of the Southern African Development Coordination Conference. He set out its policy on international sanctions against South Africa: SADCC member states’ vulnerability should not be used as an excuse by other countries for not imposing sanctions. This pamphlet reproduces his speech.

 
bar07. Barclays and South Africa

Anti-apartheid supporters campaigned to force Barclays Bank to withdraw from South Africa from 1970 until the bank pulled out in 1986. This booklet describes Barclays long history of involvement in South Africa. It set out the many ways in which Barclays supported apartheid. The booklet was published by the Haslemere Group, which played a leading part in initiating the Barclays campaign.

 
bar08. Barclays and South Africa

This report was an update of the pamphlet published by the AAM and the Haslemere Group in 1975. It showed how Barclays co-operated with the apartheid government and argued that its presence in South Africa led to increased emigration, trade and investment there.

 
she06. Shell and BP in South Africa

Shell and BP were two of South Africa’s main oil suppliers and together owned its biggest oil refinery. After the publication of the first edition of this pamphlet the Bingham Inquiry exposed their complicity in breaking oil sanctions against the illegal Smith regime in Rhodesia. The pamphlet provided a detailed exposé of how the oil companies supported white minority rule throughout Southern Africa. 

 
she07. Shell Shadow Report

In January 1987 the AAM launched a campaign for a boycott of Shell products as part of an international campaign to make Shell withdraw from South Africa. This report showed how Shell supported the South African Defence Force and collaborated with the apartheid government’s illegal occupation of Namibia. It was a revised British edition of a report originally produced by Dutch anti-apartheid organisations.

 
80s50. Selling Out to Apartheid

‘Selling Out to Apartheid’ detailed the ways in which the British government promoted trade with South Africa in defiance of growing national and international support for sanctions. 

 
bar09. Barclays Shadow Report 1981

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1981. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out in 1986.

 
 
bar10. Barclays Shadow Report 1982

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1982. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out in 1986.

 
bar11. Barclays Shadow Report 1983

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1983. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out in 1986.

 
bar12. Barclays Shadow Report 1984

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1984. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out in 1986.

 
bar13. Barclays Shadow Report 1985

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1985. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out in 1986.

 
bar14. Barclays Shadow Report 1986

In 1981 anti-apartheid campaigners set up a Barclays Shadow Board to monitor the bank’s activities in South Africa. Every year between 1981 and 1986 the Board produced an annual report showing how Barclays was supporting apartheid. This is the Board’s report for 1986. As a result of a 16-year campaign against its operations in Southern Africa Barclays pulled out later in the year.

 
80s62. The Case for a Gold Sanction

The World Gold Commission was launched in 1988 on the initiative of the Anti-Apartheid Movement, End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA), the African National Congress (ANC) and South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO). It exposed the central role gold mining played in the apartheid economy and campaigned for a worldwide ban on South African gold. This report set out a three-part strategy: gold sanctions against South Africa; the release equivalent quantities of gold from other countries’ reserves; and a training programme for South African exile students to learn gold mining and marketing skills. 

 
doc58. British Banks and South Africa

This report provided a comprehensive analysis of the involvement of British banks in South Africa in the 1970s. It concluded that the banks’ operations did more to sustain apartheid than to erode it. It recommended that British banks should terminate export credits and halt loans to South Africa, and called for a debate on the issue within the British churches. Christian Concern for Southern Africa (CCSA) was set up in 1972 to research and publicise the role played by British companies in South Africa. Its reports were widely distributed by the AAM.

 
 
 
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