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po015. ‘Anyone disobeying these laws will be imprisoned, fined and/or whipped.’

Poster summarising apartheid laws.

 
po016. A South African policeman, judge and executioner

This poster was one of a series about repression under apartheid. It featured South African exile Jan Hoogendyk dressed as a South African policeman. The 1967 Terrorism Act gave the police power to detain people indefinitely without disclosing where they were being held. At least 15 prisoners died in detention in the first few years of the Act.

 
po017. Barclays Supports Apartheid

Barclays Bank was first targeted by anti-apartheid campaigners because it guaranteed a loan for the Cabora Bassa dam project in Mozambique. The project planned to supply electricity to South Africa. This poster was produced by the Haslemere Group, one of the organisations that set up the Dambusters Mobilising Committee to oppose Western involvement in the project. The campaign against Barclays quickly escalated because Barclays DCO was South Africa’s biggest high street bank.

 
po018. ‘I work a 48 hour week for £2.10p.’

One of the AAM’s priorities was to win support from the British trade union movement. At its Congress in Blackpool in September 1971, the TUC adopted a resolution that reflected a shift towards a comprehensive anti-apartheid policy. It provided the basis for campaigning among trade unionists on arms sales, investment and emigration to South Africa. This poster reproduces the resolution.

 
po019. Prominent South African public figure seeks white workers

Poster showing a picture of Prime Minister Vorster superimposed on a picture of the South African police attacking African women. It asked British workers not to emigrate to South Africa and highlighted the role of leading British companies in supporting apartheid.

 
po020. ‘I am delighted to announce that black Rhodesians are completely sold out’

In November 1971 Conservative Foreign Secretary Lord Home published proposals for a settlement agreed with Ian Smith. The proposals fell far short of majority rule, but included a provision that they must be acceptable to the African majority. The British government sent a commission headed by Lord Pearce to test African opinion, which overwhelmingly rejected the settlement. This poster was produced for the AAM’s campaign against the sell-out.

 
po021. Fight the Sell Out in Rhodesia

Poster publicising an AAM demonstration on 13 February 1972 against the Conservative government’s proposals for a settlement on Rhodesia. The proposals fell far short of majority rule, but included a provision that they must be acceptable to the African majority. The British government sent a commission to test African opinion, which overwhelmingly rejected the settlement. The main speaker at the demonstration was Bishop Abel Muzorewa, President of the African National Council, which led the opposition to the proposals inside Zimbabwe. The Rhodesia Emergency Campaign Committee was a coalition of groups set up by the AAM.

 
po022. ‘Southern Africa in Struggle’

Poster for a meeting calling for a boycott of official celebrations of the  600th anniversary of the Anglo-Portuguese Alliance. The main speakers were Oliver Tambo and FRELIMO Vice-President Marcellino dos Santos. Labour MP Judith Hart called for Portugal to be expelled from NATO and for an end to British support for the ‘unholy alliance’ of Portugal, South Africa and Rhodesia. The meeting was attended by over 1,500 people.

 
po023. Justice for Rhodesia Campaign

From December 1972 Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) guerrilla fighters infiltrated eastern Zimbabwe and launched their first major attack on a farm in Centenary District. The AAM worked closely with the Justice for Rhodesia Campaign.

 
po024. ‘End the Alliance’

In July 1973 Portuguese dictator Marcelo Caetano visited London to mark the 600th anniversary of the Anglo-Portuguese Alliance. The AAM joined with other groups to oppose the visit. On 15 July over 12,000 demonstrators marched through central London calling for an end to British support for the ‘unholy alliance’ of Portugal, South Africa and Rhodesia. They included trade unionists and a delegation from the Black People’s Freedom Movement.

 
po025. Wanted: Freedom for Ahmed Kathrada

In the early 1970s AAM local groups adopted individual South African political prisoners and campaigned on their behalf. West London AA Group took up the case of Ahmed Kathrada, sentenced to life imprisonment at the Rivonia trial in 1964. Kathrada spent 25 years in prison and was released in November 1989.

 
po026. Release All Political Prisoners in Southern Africa Join the Campaign

Poster produced by Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society (SATIS) soon after its launch on 8 December 1973. SATIS was set up by the AAM, International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF), National Union of Students, the AUEW (TASS) and Ruskin Kitson Committees and London Trades Council. It campaigned on behalf of political prisoners throughout Southern Africa for the following 20 years.

 
po028. Save SWAPO Leaders

SWAPO leaders Aaron Mushimba and Hendrik Shikongo were sentenced to death under the Terrorism Act on 12 May 1976. With the Namibia Support Committee, SATIS promoted an international campaign for their release. It distributed thousands of postcards calling on the British government to intervene and held a demonstration outside South Africa House. The two men were released on appeal in 1977.

 
po173. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 1

As part of a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa, in the autumn of 1974 Durham Students Union asked Junior Common Rooms at all the university’s constituent colleges to discuss and vote on the issue. This poster asked students to call for disinvestment. In the subsequent votes, over 63% of those who voted supported the disinvestment campaign.

 
po174. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 2

As part of a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa, in the autumn of 1974 Durham Students Union asked Junior Common Rooms at all the university’s constituent colleges to discuss and vote on the issue. This poster, asking students to vote for disinvestment, echoes an iconic first world war army recruitment poster. At the subsequent meetings, over 63% of students who voted supported the disinvestment campaign.

 
po175. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 3

From 1972 Durham University Students Union ran a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa. This poster asked students to support the campaign. In the early 1970s more than half of all British universities and colleges campaigned for their governing bodies to disinvest from South Africa.

 
po176. Durham University Disinvestment Campaign 4

As part of a long-running campaign to pressure Durham University to sell its shares in companies operating in South Africa, in the autumn of 1974 Durham Students Union asked Junior Common Rooms at all the university’s constituent colleges to discuss and vote on the issue. This poster asked students to vote for disinvestment. At the subsequent meetings, over 63% of those who voted supported the disinvestment campaign.

 
po177. ‘Support NUS Disinvestment Campaign’

Students at Durham University first asked the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African subsidiaries in 1972. In 1974 they rejected the response of the University Council, which endorsed the British government’s code of conduct for companies investing in South Africa. This poster publicised a national demonstration against the university’s refusal to sell, held in February 1975. Over 1,000 students marched through Durham. Speakers included trade unionist John Hosey, whose son Sean was imprisoned in South Africa. Durham University’s Vice-Chancellor responded by circulating other universities suggesting they should ensure British influence in South Africa was exerted against apartheid. This was rejected by Durham students, who continued to campaign for disinvestment.

 
po182. NUS/AAM Southern Africa Liberation Fund

Poster advertising the Southern Africa Liberation Fund set up by the NUS as a clearing house for funds raised by local student unions for the Southern African liberation movements. Collecting material aid was one of the main activities of British students who took action on Southern Africa in the 1970s.

 
po178. SWAPO women’s tour, 1975

Poster publicising a speaking tour of Europe by Putuse Appolus from the Namibian Women’s League and a representative of SWAPO’s Youth League in the summer of 1975. The two women spent two weeks in Britain, meeting women’s groups, student unions and labour movement representatives. The UN designated 1975 as International Women’s Year.

 
 
 
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