Advance Search

Up

Posters

po047. Call to Action

This poster reprinted a call to trade unions from the Programme of Action against Apartheid adopted by the UN General Assembly. It was widely distributed by the AAM Trade Union Committee.

 
po049. Stop the Execution of Solomon Mahlangu

Solomon Mahlangu was a young ANC freedom fighter sentenced to death in March 1978 for his involvement in a gun battle with police in which two men died. The judge accepted that he had not fired the fatal shots. Together with the ANC, the AAM campaigned in Britain against the sentence. As a result, the British Foreign Secretary David Owen intervened with the South African government. Despite worldwide demands for clemency, Mahlangu was hanged on 6 April 1979.

 
po048. Boycott Barclays

Poster produced for the campaign to make Barclays Bank withdraw from South Africa. The campaign started in 1969 in response to Barclays’ involvement in financing the Cabora Bassa dam in Mozambique. Students played a big part in the campaign, which asked individuals and organisations to withdraw their accounts. Barclays finally pulled out of South Africa in 1986. 

 
po050. Stop the Execution of the Katumba Brothers!

The Katumba Brothers, 16-year-old Benchard and 19-year-old Leavit, were sentenced to death in 1979 by the illegal government headed by Bishop Abel Muzorewa. They were convicted of ‘carrying arms of war’. This poster was produced by the Zimbabwe Emergency Campaign Committee, set up by the AAM, to ask the British government to intervene to stop the hangings.

 
po163. ‘No Sell Out in Zimbabwe’

In the summer of 1979 the AAM campaigned to stop the Conservative government elected in May 1979 from recognising the Muzorewa government in Zimbabwe. This poster was produced for the AAM rally and march through central London on 30 June calling for genuine independence in Zimbabwe under the leadership of the Zimbabwean Patriotic Front.

 
po052. Look before you buy. Boycott the products of apartheid

Poster asking shoppers to boycott South African goods. This was a reprint of a poster first produced in 1978. Some of the items incorporate images of the shootings of school students in Soweto in June 1976.

 
po053. The Freedom Charter

The Freedom Charter was adopted by the Congress of the People held in South Africa in 1955. In the 1980s it once again became a rallying point for anti-apartheid organisations within the country. The ANC declared 1980 the ‘Year of the Charter’ and the AAM distributed thousands of copies of the Freedom Charter during the year.

 
po051. International Seminar on Transnational Corporations

Poster for a seminar organised by the AAM and the UN Special Committee Against Apartheid, 2–4 November 1979. The seminar planned internationally co-ordinated campaigns against corporations that exported arms and oil to South Africa and against banks and financial institutions.

 
po054. Zimbabwe Freedom Rally!

Poster advertising a rally on 17 April 1980 to celebrate the conclusion of the Lancaster House talks agreeing the settlement that led to one-person one-vote elections in Zimbabwe.

 
po064. Demo! Sunday March 14 1982

Poster publicising the demonstration held in central London as the climax of the Anti-Apartheid Movement’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ campaign. 15,000 people marched from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square to hear speeches from ANC and SWAPO presidents Oliver Tambo and Sam Nujoma, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Tony Benn, the only black member of the British Sports Council Paul Stephenson and immigration campaigner Anwar Ditta. This was the biggest AAM demonstration since the march to protest against the Sharpeville shootings in 1960. On the morning of the demonstration, the ANC office in London was bombed.

 
 
po055. Anti-Apartheid Fortnight of Action

Poster advertising an AAM fortnight of events to celebrate South Africa Freedom Day, 26 June 1980. The poster provided space for local anti-apartheid groups to insert information about local activities.

 
po065. ¡DEMO! ¡DEMO! ¡DEMO! SUNDAY MARCH 14 1982

Poster publicising the demonstration held in central London as the climax of the Anti-Apartheid Movement’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ campaign. 15,000 people marched from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square to hear speeches from ANC and SWAPO presidents Oliver Tambo and Sam Nujoma, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Tony Benn, the only black member of the British Sports Council Paul Stephenson and immigration campaigner Anwar Ditta. This was the biggest AAM demonstration since the march to protest against the Sharpeville shootings in 1960. On the morning of the demonstration, the ANC office in London was bombed.

 
po057. Zimbabwe, 1980

In the run-up to the elections in Zimbabwe in 1980 there were fears that there would be intimidation and vote-rigging in favour of Bishop Muzorewa’s United African National Council. The Zimbabwe Emergency Campaign Committee asked the British government to ensure that the election was free and fair. This poster publicised the campaign.

 
po058. Divide and Rule: South Africa’s Bantustans

Under apartheid 87 per cent of South Africa’s land was reserved for whites. Rural Africans were confined to the overcrowded Bantustans and urban Africans were treated as migrant workers. This poster shows how the Bantustans were made up of small fragmented parcels of land. 

 
po060. ‘Free Nelson Mandela!’, 1980

Poster produced for the AAM campaign for freedom for Nelson Mandela in response to a petition launched by the South African Sunday Post in 1980. A declaration calling for Mandela’s release was endorsed by MPs, trade unions, playwrights, musicians and academics in Britain. The AAM distributed thousands of badges, leaflets and stickers calling for Mandela’s release. The following year Glasgow became the first British city to award him the freedom of the city. In the 1980s buildings, streets and public gardens all over Britain were renamed in his honour.

 
po067. Anti-Apartheid Movement Says: Forward to Freedom in South Africa and Namibia!

One of a set of four posters produced for the AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ demonstration on 14 March 1982. At the same time as it called for the total isolation of South Africa, the AAM called for support for the liberation movements and all those fighting for freedom in Southern Africa. After Zimbabwe won its independence in 1980, the AAM concentrated its activities on Namibia and South Africa.

 
po068. Solidarity with SWAPO!

One of a set of four posters produced for the AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ demonstration on 14 March 1982. At the same time as it called for the total isolation of South Africa, the AAM called for support for the liberation movements and all those fighting for freedom in Southern Africa. After Zimbabwe won its independence in 1980, the AAM concentrated its activities on Namibia and South Africa.

 
po069. Solidarity with ANC!

One of a set of four posters produced for the AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ demonstration on 14 March 1982. At the same time as it called for the total isolation of South Africa, the AAM called for support for the liberation movements and all those fighting for freedom in Southern Africa. After Zimbabwe won its independence in 1980, the AAM concentrated its activities on Namibia and South Africa.

 
po059. Free Nelson Mandela

Poster advertising a rally on South Africa Freedom Day, 26 June, to mark the 25th anniversary of the Freedom Charter. The rally was organised by an umbrella group, the South Africa Freedom Day Committee, and the main speaker was ANC Secretary-General Alfred Nzo. The ANC declared 1980 the ‘Year of the Charter’ and the AAM distributed thousands of copies of the Freedom Charter during the year.

 
po061. Stop the apartheid bomb

The AAM launched the World Campaign Against Military and Nuclear Collaboration in 1979. Its aim was to expose military and nuclear collaboration with South Africa and strengthen the UN arms embargo. Much of AAM’s international activity in the 1980s was through this campaign, collaborating with national anti-apartheid groups worldwide. Action included presenting detailed evidence to the UN about breaches of its mandatory embargo.

 
 
 
Powered by Phoca Download