Advance Search

Up

1980s

80s01. ‘Southern Africa after Zimbabwe’ conference

The AAM organised this conference in May 1980 to discuss action on South Africa and Namibia in the new situation created by the independence of Zimbabwe. It was attended by over 400 participants from student, trade union and church organisations. High on the agenda were campaigns to free Nelson Mandela and against Western nuclear collaboration with South Africa. The speakers included representatives of the ANC and SWAPO, Dan Smith from CND, Sam Ramsamy, Chair of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SANROC) and Brian Wood of the Namibia Support Committee.

 
po059. ‘Free Nelson Mandela’, 1980

Poster advertising a rally on South Africa Freedom Day, 26 June 1980, to mark the 25th anniversary of the Freedom Charter. The rally was organised by an umbrella group, the South Africa Freedom Day Committee, and the main speaker was ANC Secretary-General Alfred Nzo. The ANC declared 1980 the ‘Year of the Charter’ and the AAM distributed thousands of copies of the Freedom Charter during the year.

 
gov15. Memorandum to the British Government

Memorandum presented by the AAM at a meeting with Richard Luce, Under Secretary at the Foreign Office, in June 1980. The AAM protested at Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s statement welcoming changes in South Africa’s domestic policies, after police had opened fire on students in Cape Town. It questioned the British government’s claim that it had no standing on the issue of the release of Nelson Mandela.

 
po055. Anti-Apartheid Fortnight of Action

Poster advertising an AAM fortnight of events to celebrate South Africa Freedom Day, 26 June 1980. The poster provided space for local anti-apartheid groups to insert information about local activities.

 
80s02. ‘Southern Africa after Zimbabwe independence’

After Zimbabwe achieved majority government in 1980, the AAM warned against any relaxation of attempts to end apartheid in South Africa and Namibia. This leaflet argued against British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s statement that there should be an end to the isolation of South Africa. Instead it called on the British government to support UN mandatory economic sanctions against South Africa and for solidarity with the frontline states. The leaflet announced two weeks of intensive campaigning, 16–30 June 1980.

 
gov16. Letter from Margaret Thatcher to Abdul Minty

Letter from Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher commenting on the AAM’s memorandum of June 1980. She reiterated that the government had no standing in the case of Nelson Mandela, although she said his release would be ‘widely welcomed’. 

 
pic 8004. Demonstration against Fluor UK

Demonstrators outside the London headquarters of Fluor UK on 10 March 1980. Fluor was the British subsidiary of a US multinational that was bidding for a contract to build a new oil-from-coal plant for the South African state energy company SASOL. The picket was organised by End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA).

 
pic8107. South Africa Freedom Day rally, 26 June 1981

ANC President Oliver Tambo was the main speaker at a rally held in London to mark South Africa Freedom Day on 26 June 1981. He told AAM supporters ‘It is your struggle as it is ours’. Also on the platform were ANC representative Ruth Mompati, FRELIMO leader and future Mozambique President Armando Guebuza, SACTU General Secretary John Gaetsewe and SWAPO Deputy Secretary for Labour P Munyaro.

 
80s08. ‘The Case for Sanctions’ lecture series

This leaflet advertised a series of lectures putting the case for sanctions against South Africa organised by the AAM and the Africa Centre. The lectures followed a conference on sanctions organised by the UN and the Organisation of African Unity that declared 1982 the International Year of Mobilisation for Sanctions Against South Africa.

 
80s03. Labour Party conference fringe meeting

 

Every year the AAM held a meeting at the Labour Party conference with speakers from the Southern African liberation movements and the parliamentary Labour Party. The 1981 meeting focused on economic sanctions and South Africa’s aggression against Angola. The Labour Party declared itself in favour of UN mandatory economic sanctions against South Africa at its 1979 national conference. 

 
80s04. AAM/Labour Party conference

The 1981 Labour Party conference passed a comprehensive resolution on sanctions against South Africa. This leaflet publicised a joint AAM/Labour Party conference that followed up the resolution by suggesting ways that local Labour Party members could take action. It also discussed practical initiatives for a future Labour government. The conference was attended by 100 delegates from constituency Labour parties and trade unions.

 
pic8201. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ conference

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference, 11–13 March 1982, was its most ambitious initiative to date. The Vice President of Nigeria, Dr Alex Ekwueme, gave the keynote address and the leaders of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the Chair of the TUC International Committee were among the speakers from Britain. The liberation movements were represented by ANC General Secretary Alfred Nzo and SWAPO Chairman David Meroro. The conference was attended by church representatives, trade unionists, local authorities and women’s, youth and student organisations. Left to right: Dr Alex Ekwueme, Abdul Minty, Bob Hughes MP and Archbishop Trevor Huddleston.

 
80s07. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ Declaration

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference, 11–13 March 1982, was its most ambitious initiative to date. The Vice President of Nigeria, Dr Alex Ekwueme, gave the keynote address and the leaders of the Labour and Liberal Parties, the Chair of the TUC International Committee and ANC and SWAPO representatives were among the speakers. The conference was attended by church representatives, trade unionists, local authorities and delegates from women’s, youth and student organisations. This Declaration was widely distributed and presented to Foreign Secretary Lord Carrington by the AAM’s President, Bishop Trevor Huddleston, and Hon. Secretary, Abdul Minty, the day after the conference.

 
pic8225. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ conference

Labour Party leader Michael Foot speaking at the  AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference in March 1982. The conference was attended by church representatives, trade unionists, local authorities and women’s, youth and student organisations. 

 
80s05. ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ conference

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference, 11–13 March 1982, was its most ambitious initiative to date. The Vice President of Nigeria, Dr Alex Ekwueme, gave the keynote address and the leaders of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the Chair of the TUC International Committee were among the speakers from Britain. The liberation movements were represented by ANC General Secretary Alfred Nzo and SWAPO Chairman David Meroro. The conference was attended by church representatives, trade unionists, local authorities and delegates from women’s, youth and student organisations.

 
80s09. UN Appeal

The AAM distributed this appeal from the Chair of the UN Special Committee Against Apartheid, Nigerian Ambassador Alhaji Yusuf Maitama-Sule, at its ‘Southern Africa: The Time to Choose’ conference in March 1982. 

 
Pic8203. ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ demonstration

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference culminated in a 15,000-strong march and rally on 14 March 1982. The rally was the biggest anti-apartheid demonstration since Sharpeville in 1960. Speakers included ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo, representatives of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the TUC, asylum seekers campaigner Anwar Ditta and the only black member of the British Sports Council, Paul Stephenson. On the morning of the demonstration a bomb blast destroyed part of the ANC’s London office.

 
po064. Demo! Sunday March 14 1982

Poster publicising the demonstration held in central London as the climax of the Anti-Apartheid Movement’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ campaign. 15,000 people marched from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square to hear speeches from ANC and SWAPO presidents Oliver Tambo and Sam Nujoma, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Tony Benn, the only black member of the British Sports Council Paul Stephenson and immigration campaigner Anwar Ditta. This was the biggest AAM demonstration since the march to protest against the Sharpeville shootings in 1960. On the morning of the demonstration, the ANC office in London was bombed.

 
 
po065. ¡DEMO! ¡DEMO! ¡DEMO! SUNDAY MARCH 14 1982

Poster publicising the demonstration held in central London as the climax of the Anti-Apartheid Movement’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ campaign. 15,000 people marched from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square to hear speeches from ANC and SWAPO presidents Oliver Tambo and Sam Nujoma, Labour MPs Joan Lestor and Tony Benn, the only black member of the British Sports Council Paul Stephenson and immigration campaigner Anwar Ditta. This was the biggest AAM demonstration since the march to protest against the Sharpeville shootings in 1960. On the morning of the demonstration, the ANC office in London was bombed.

 
pic8205. ‘Southern Africa: The Time Choose’ demonstration

The AAM’s ‘Southern Africa: the Time to Choose’ conference culminated in a 15,000-strong march and rally on 14 March 1982. The rally was the biggest anti-apartheid demonstration since Sharpeville in 1960. Speakers included ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo, representatives of the Labour and Liberal Parties and the TUC, asylum seekers campaigner Anwar Ditta and the only black member of the British Sports Council, Paul Stephenson. On the morning of the demonstration a bomb blast destroyed part of the ANC’s London office.

 
 
 
Powered by Phoca Download