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Barclays and Shell

bar01. Mozambique – Cabora Bassa

The huge Cabora Bassa dam project in Mozambique was a collaboration between South Africa, Rhodesia and Portugal. Barclays Bank was first targeted by anti-apartheid campaigners because it was one of the British companies involved. The project was intended to supply electricity to South Africa.

 
bar02. ‘Stop Cabora Bassa – Boycott Barclays’

Barclays Bank was first targeted by anti-apartheid campaigners because it was involved in the Cabora Bassa dam project in Mozambique. The campaign against it grew because it was one of the biggest banks in Southern Africa. The Dambusters Mobilising Committee was a coalition of groups including the AAM set up on the initiative of the African National Congress.

 
70s08. Cabora Bassa and the Struggle for Southern Africa

The huge Cabora Bassa dam project in Mozambique was a collaboration between South Africa, Rhodesia and Portugal. The project was intended to supply electricity to South Africa. This pamphlet was written for the Dambusters Mobilising Committee, a coalition of groups set up to campaign against the involvement of British companies in the project. The pamphlet and a campaign poster were funded by the WCC’s Programme to Combat Racism.

 
bar03. ‘You and Your Money’

Anti-apartheid supporters campaigned to force Barclays Bank to withdraw from South Africa from 1970 until the bank pulled out in 1986. The Haslemere Group played a leading part in initiating the campaign. In 1971 it pioneered the tactic of buying shares to protest at a company annual general meeting.

 
bar05. A Dozen Reasons to Boycott Barclays

Students were at the forefront of the boycott of Barclays Bank. Student unions banned Barclays from freshers fairs and students picketed Barclays branches to persuade others to close their accounts. This leaflet set out the ways in which the bank supported apartheid.

 
bar07. Barclays and South Africa

Anti-apartheid supporters campaigned to force Barclays Bank to withdraw from South Africa from 1970 until the bank pulled out in 1986. This booklet describes Barclays long history of involvement in South Africa. It set out the many ways in which Barclays supported apartheid. The booklet was published by the Haslemere Group, which played a leading part in initiating the Barclays campaign.

 
gov09. Letter from James Callaghan to Robert Hughes

In 1976 the AAM publicised Barclays Bank’s purchase of South African defence bonds, issued to help the apartheid government fight SWAPO guerrillas in Namibia. This letter from Prime Minister James Callaghan to AAM Chair Bob Hughes MP acknowledged that public opinion in Britain was opposed to the purchase and promised to raise the matter with Barclays.

 
po017. Barclays Supports Apartheid

Barclays Bank was first targeted by anti-apartheid campaigners because it guaranteed a loan for the Cabora Bassa dam project in Mozambique. The project planned to supply electricity to South Africa. This poster was produced by the Haslemere Group, one of the organisations that set up the Dambusters Mobilising Committee to oppose Western involvement in the project. The campaign against Barclays quickly escalated because Barclays DCO was South Africa’s biggest high street bank.

 
gov12. Submission to Government Inquiry on Sanctions Busting by Shell and BP

In 1977 the British government set up the Bingham Inquiry into allegations that Shell and BP had supplied oil to Rhodesia in contravention of UN sanctions. This submission exposed Shell and BP’s sanctions busting operations. It asked the British government to press South Africa to allow international scrutiny of British-owned oil companies in South Africa. 

 
pic7707. Hull AA Group picket Barclays

Hull AA Group picketed Barclays Bank in April 1977 as part of the long-running AAM campaign to force Barclays to withdraw from South Africa. Leafleting Barclays customers to persuade them to withdraw their accounts from Barclays was a regular activity for most local anti-apartheid groups during the 1970s and early 1980s. As a result of the campaign, Barclays Bank withdrew from South Africa in 1986.

 
gov14. Memorandum on Oil Sanctions and Rhodesia

The Bingham Inquiry found that British oil companies Shell and BP had supplied oil to Rhodesia in contravention of UN sanctions. This memorandum asked the British government to ensure that the companies restricted oil supplies to South Africa to pre-UDI levels to prevent the re-export of oil to the illegal Smith regime. It called for the extension of sanctions to South Africa unless it gave assurances that it would implement UN sanctions against Rhodesia.

 
bdg09. Boycott Barclays
 
70s27. BP and Shell Factsheet

As the South African economy became less attractive to foreign investors in 1977/78, the AAM stepped up its campaign against British companies with big South African interests. The oil companies BP and Shell were among its main targets. This factsheet showed how the companies’ were helping South Africa develop its energy resources and diversifying into coal and petrochemicals. Other target companies were GEC, ICI, Barclays Bank and British Steel.

 
bar08. Barclays and South Africa

This report was an update of the pamphlet published by the AAM and the Haslemere Group in 1975. It showed how Barclays co-operated with the apartheid government and argued that its presence in South Africa led to increased emigration, trade and investment there.

 
she06. Shell and BP in South Africa

Shell and BP were two of South Africa’s main oil suppliers and together owned its biggest oil refinery. After the publication of the first edition of this pamphlet the Bingham Inquiry exposed their complicity in breaking oil sanctions against the illegal Smith regime in Rhodesia. The pamphlet provided a detailed exposé of how the oil companies supported white minority rule throughout Southern Africa. 

 
pic7908. Picket of Barclays Bank, Leeds

Anti-apartheid supporters picketed around 250 branches of Barclays Bank all over Britain on 1 March 1978. The pickets were part of a March month of action against apartheid held to launch the UN International Anti-Apartheid Year. British-owned Barclays Bank was the biggest high street bank in South Africa. After a 16-year campaign by the AAM, Barclays withdrew from South Africa in 1986.

 
pic7909. Picket of Barclays Bank, London

Anti-apartheid supporters picketed around 250 branches of Barclays Bank all over Britain on 1 March 1978. The pickets were part of a March month of action against apartheid held to launch the UN International Anti-Apartheid Year. The photograph shows a protest outside a branch of Barclays in Victoria, central London organised by End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA). British-owned Barclays Bank was the biggest high street bank in South Africa. After a 16-year campaign by the AAM, Barclays withdrew from South Africa in 1986.

 
pic7910. Picket of Barclays Bank, Southampton

Southampton AA Group supporters delivered a giant Barclays cheque to the local Barclays branch on 4 April 1979. The cheque was made payable ‘for bribery and corruption by the South African Government’ and signed ‘Connie Muldergate’. South African Information Minister Connie Mulder was forced to resign because he established a government slush fund to promote South Africa’s image overseas.

 
po048. Boycott Barclays

Poster produced for the campaign to make Barclays Bank withdraw from South Africa. The campaign started in 1969 in response to Barclays’ involvement in financing the Cabora Bassa dam in Mozambique. Students played a big part in the campaign, which asked individuals and organisations to withdraw their accounts. Barclays finally pulled out of South Africa in 1986. 

 
pic8104. Barclays Bank Annual General Meeting

Actor Julie Christie (centre) with Jane Goldsmith of the World University Service and Gerry Gillman, General Secretary of the clerical workers union CPSA, outside the annual general meeting of Barclays Bank in April 1981. They were members of a ‘shadow board’ set up in January 1981 under the chairmanship of Oxford philosopher Michael Dummett to monitor the bank’s activities in Southern Africa. Barclays finally pulled out of South Africa in 1986.

 
 
 
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