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Faith organisations

6901. World Council of Churches Consultation on Racism, May 1969

The Consultation on Racism held in Notting Hill, London, 19–24 May 1969 led to the setting up of the WCC’s Programme to Combat Racism (PCR). The consultation concluded that force could be used to combat racism in situations where non-violent political strategies had failed. The PCR gave grants for humanitarian use to the Southern African liberation movements and other anti-apartheid organisations, including the AAM. In the centre of the photograph are the Archbishop of Canterbury Michael Ramsey and Trevor Huddleston.

 
lgs10. Bristol Cathedral public meeting

Leaflet advertising an interdenominational meeting in Bristol Cathedral on the immorality of apartheid. The speaker was the AAM’s President Archbishop Trevor Huddleston and the meeting was sponsored by the Anglican, Catholic, Baptist and Methodist churches.

 
doc58. British Banks and South Africa

This report provided a comprehensive analysis of the involvement of British banks in South Africa in the 1970s. It concluded that the banks’ operations did more to sustain apartheid than to erode it. It recommended that British banks should terminate export credits and halt loans to South Africa, and called for a debate on the issue within the British churches. Christian Concern for Southern Africa (CCSA) was set up in 1972 to research and publicise the role played by British companies in South Africa. Its reports were widely distributed by the AAM.

 
mda16. Nelson Mandela tribute service

Invitation card for a service of tribute to Nelson Mandela on his 70th birthday at St James’s Church, Piccadilly.

 
pic8814. Prayer vigil at Kingston Guildhall

AAM supporters held a prayer vigil on the steps of Kingston Guildhall to show their opposition to a proposal by Kingston Council to invest pension funds in South Africa. Kingston Trades Council presented a petition to the Council asking it to reconsider.

 
fai01. ‘South Africa and Ourselves’

This leaflet set out the policies of the various Christian denominations in Britain towards investment in South Africa. It asked church people to press for progressive disengagement. The leaflet was produced by the British Council of Churches and Christian Concern for Southern Africa (CCSA), a group that worked closely with the AAM.

 
fai02. Inter-Faith Colloquium Declaration

This Declaration was made by an Inter-Faith Colloquium on Apartheid organised by the AAM’s President, Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, in March 1984. The Colloquium led to the setting up of the AAM’s Multi-Faith Committee, which held its first meeting at the Central Gurdwara in London at the beginning of 1985. 

 
pic8501. Churchmen protest outside South Africa House

Members of the AAM’s Multi-Faith Committee held daily silent lunch hour vigils outside the South African Embassy in the week before Easter. The committee was formed in 1985 to bring together people of different faiths in opposition to apartheid.

 
6902. World Council of Churches Consultation on Racism, May 1969

Trevor Huddleston, then Bishop of Stepney, London, and ANC president Oliver Tambo at the World Council of Churches Consultation on Racism, held in Notting Hill, London, 19–24 May 1969. The consultation concluded that force could be used to combat racism in situations where non-violent political strategies had failed. The PCR gave grants for humanitarian purposes to the Southern African liberation movements and other anti-apartheid organisations, including the AAM.

 
pic8732. Seder for Freedom in Southern Africa

Jews Against Apartheid was formed in August 1986 and played an important part in the AAM’s Multi-Faith Committee. Over 150 Jews met outside South Africa House on 16 April 1987 to conduct a Seder for Freedom in Southern Africa. In the picture are Rabbis Alexandra Wright, Colin Eimer and Daniel Smith and writer Bernard Kops.

 
pic8606. ‘Church Commissioners – Disinvest from Apartheid’

Supporters of End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA) held a vigil outside outside Church House, Westminster on 29 July. They called on the Church Commissioners, who administered the Church of England’s large investment portfolio, to sell its shares in companies with investments in South Africa.

 
fai05. ‘Apartheid – A Religious Response’

Brochure calling on all people of faith in Britain to keep up the pressure on President de Klerk to enter into genuine negotiations for a democratic constitution in South Africa. The brochure argued that the campaign for comprehensive sanctions against South Africa should continue until apartheid had been irreversibly dismantled.

 
int44a. Pauline Webb interview clip

Pauline Webb is a Methodist minister who began her career in the church’s Overseas Division and worked for the Methodist Missionary Society. In 1968 she attended the seminal Fourth Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Uppsala, Sweden, which led to the setting up of the Programme to Combat Racism. She served as Vice-Moderator of the WCC and later became Head of Religious Programmes at the BBC World Service. She was a strong supporter of the Anti-Apartheid Movement and spoke at numerous meetings and conferences, including the AAM’s first women’s conference in 1976. 

In this clip Pauline Webb describes the controversy provoked within the churches by the WCC’s decision to set up the Programme to Combat Racism.

 
po169. Mass Lobby for Sanctions, 1986

Poster publicising a parliamentary lobby on 17 June 1986 calling on the British government to impose sanctions against South Africa. More than 3,500 people lobbied their MPs askin them to press for a change of policy. The lobby was initiated by the AAM, with support from the TUC, British Council of Churches and the United Nations Association. The summer of 1986 was the high point of the international campaign for sanctions against South Africa. 

 
fai07. A Multi-Faith Response to Apartheid

This leaflet asked people of faith to boycott South Africa and challenge investments there. It showed how apartheid was incompatible with the beliefs of all the world’s major religions.

 
fai06. ‘South Africa – Freedom Now!’

This membership leaflet asked people of faith to join the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

 
fai03. Carols for Liberation

The AAM’s Multi-Faith Committee held a carol service in Trafalgar Square on 21 December 1986. The singing was led by the ANC and SWAPO choirs and the London Community Gospel Choir, and other groups gave readings on the situation in Namibia and South Africa. The event was sponsored by the four leading black London newspapers.

 
int45a1. Brian Filling interview clip 1

 

Brian Filling became involved in anti-apartheid campaigning as a student at Glasgow University in the late 1960s. He was a founder of the Scottish AAM Committee in 1976 and served as its Chair from 1976 to 1994, when he became Chair of ACTSA Scotland. He was a member of the Executive Committee of Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) from 1994 to 2011 and is now Honorary Consul for South Africa in Scotland. He was awarded the National Order of Companions of O R Tambo, the highest award made to non-South Africans, by the Republic of South Africa in 2012. 

In this clip Brian Filling talks about the historical ties between Scotland and South Africa and the arguments within the Church of Scotland over sanctions against apartheid.

 

 

 
int25a. David Haslam interview clip

David Haslam is a Methodist minister who attended the seminal Fourth Assembly of the World Council of Churches held in Sweden in 1968. He was one of the founders of End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA) in 1974 and later helped set up the EMBARGO campaign against oil shipments to South Africa. In the early 1970s he served on the National Executive Committee of the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

In this clip David Haslam describes some of the campaign actions he and his parishioners carried out.

 
fai04. Memorial for Steve Biko

The memorial meeting for Steve Biko held on Sunday 13 September 1987 marked the tenth anniversary of his death in detention. A packed congregation at Notting Hill Methodist Church in west London heard readings by Muslims, Jews and Christians and an address by Barney Pityana. The event was organised by the AAM’s Multi-Faith Committee and SATIS (Southern Africa the Imprisoned Society).

 
 
 
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