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stu12. ‘Free the Political Prisoners!’

London students demonstrated in support of Nelson Mandela and other South African political prisoners in February 1964. This leaflet publicised a march preceding a dramatised presentation of prisoners’ lives organised by the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners in Central Hall, Westminster.

 
pri12. ‘Torture in South Africa’

In the 1960s the AAM used theatre to alert the British public to the increasing use of torture in South Africa. Actors like the National Theatre’s Robert Lang took part in this dramatised presentation of what it was like to be a political prisoner. Students from the University of London’s Society Against Racial Discrimination held a torchlight march to the event.

 
pic6402. Students march for Rivonia trialists

Sussex University students marched from Brighton to London on 12 and 13 June 1964, on the eve of the sentencing of Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. The march was organised by Thabo Mbeki, whose father Govan Mbeki was one of the accused.

 
pic6501. Vigil to remember the victims of Sharpeville

Anti-apartheid supporters holding wreaths in memory of the 69 people shot at Sharpeville outside South Africa House. An ‘in memoriam’ book was signed by 3,500 people in St Martin’s in the Fields and a public meeting was held there to commemorate the anniversary. Students at University College London held a South Africa week and Cambridge City Council voted to ban South African produce from its civic restaurant.

 
stu20. Student Landrover appeal


Leaflet asking London students to help set up a fundraising appeal for the African National Congress (ANC) and Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU) in 1969. Fundraising for the liberation movements was one of the main student activities on Southern Africa in the late 1960s and 1970s.

 
po184. ‘Springboks Piss Off!’

More than 7,000 people took part in a march to protest against the South African rugby Springboks game against Northern Counties on 26 November 1969. Many of the marchers were students from Manchester and Liverpool Universities. This poster was produced by Manchester students. Around 2,000 police were deployed to stop protesters running onto the pitch. There were anti-apartheid protests at all 24 games in the Springboks 1969/70 tour of Britain and Ireland.

 
pic7012. Liverpool University sit-in, 1970

In March 1970 Liverpool students occupied the university’s Senate House to press five demands that included disinvestment from South Africa and the resignation of the University’s Chancellor, the Marquess of Salisbury. Lord Salisbury was an outspoken supporter of the minority white regime in Rhodesia. The sit-in lasted 10 days and got national press coverage. Nine students were suspended and one, Pete Cresswell, was expelled. Among the suspended students was Jon Snow, seen here interrupting a meeting with representatives of the university authorities.

 
stu23. NUS/AAM conference report, 1972


In September 1971 the National Union of Students, AAM and Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guiné set up a student network to coordinate student campaigning on Southern Africa. Every year through the 1970s the network held an annual conference to share information and discuss campaign priorities. This is the report of the first NUS/AAM student network conference, held in September 1972.

 
stu41. ‘Sphinx’ Liverpool student newsletter, 1970

In March 1970 Liverpool students occupied the university’s Senate House to press five demands that included disinvestment from South Africa and the resignation of the University’s Chancellor, the Marquess of Salisbury. Lord Salisbury was an outspoken supporter of the minority white regime in Rhodesia. The sit-in lasted 10 days and got national press coverage. Nine students were suspended and one, Pete Cresswell, was expelled. This issue of Sphinx, the student newsletter, explains the background to the sit-in.

 
stu22. NUS AAM: Free Southern Africa


In September 1971 the National Union of Students, AAM and Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guiné set up a student network to coordinate student campaigning on Southern Africa. The aim was to recruit representatives at every British university and college. The network campaigned for universities to disinvest from companies involved in South Africa and for a boycott of Barclays Bank. It raised funds for the Southern African liberation movements and organised protests against the arrest of students within South Africa. This handbook provided information for student activists.

 
stu16. White Trash No. 1

The first issue of the University of East Anglia AA Group’s newsletter publicised fundraising for the African National Council of Rhodesia. The ANC was spearheading African rejection of British government proposals for an agreement with the white minority regime. Fundraising for the liberation movements was one of the main student activities on Southern Africa in the 1970s.

 
stu01. NUS/AAM conference leaflet, 1972

In September 1971 the National Union of Students, the AAM and the Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guiné set up a network to coordinate student campaigning on Southern Africa. The aim was to recruit representatives at every British university and college. This letter to student activists publicised the first of the annual conferences held by the network in the 1970s and 1980s. The 1972 conference set out three priorities: disinvestment from companies involved in South Africa, fundraising for the liberation movements and educational work on Namibia.

 
stu17. White Trash No. 2

In the early 1970s University of East Anglia students set up scholarship for a student from Southern Africa. This issue of the UEA AA Group’s newsletter publicised events to raise funds for the scholarship. It also publicised African opposition to the British government’s proposals for a deal with the white minority regime in Rhodesia.

 
stu19. Hull students support Toivo ja Toivo

Hull University Students Union appointed South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO) leader Hermann Toivo ja Toivo as its Honorary Vice-President in the early 1970s. Toivo was serving a 20-year prison sentence on Robben Island.

 
stu24. Company University: The Hull Sit-in


This booklet tells the story of Hull students’ campaign to make the university sever its links with the food company Reckitt & Colman because of the company’s operations in South Africa. The Hull sit-in was one of many student disinvestment campaigns in the 1970s.

 
stu10. The Manchester Connection

In October 1972 Manchester University students asked the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African interests. This broadsheet publicised a picket of a meeting of the University Council called to discuss the university’s investment policy in February 1973. When the Council referred the issue to its investment sub-committee, students protested by occupying the administration building.

 
stu40. Manchester Connection no. 8

Manchester University students first asked the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African interests In October 1972. In response to a vigorous student campaign and national publicity about the below subsistence wages paid to South African workers, the University Council agreed to press companies in which it held shares to pay higher wages. This was rejected by the student union and students occupied the Council Chamber in protest. Manchester students argued that all investment in South Africa supported apartheid and that the university must disinvest. This newsletter reprinted the statements issued by the university authorities and the student union, and urged students to attend a union general meeting to discuss the next step in the campaign. 

 
stu21. University College Swansea disinvestment campaign

In 1973 the student union at University College Swansea voted to call on the university authorities to sell shares in companies with South African interests. This pamphlet set out the case for disinvestment.

 
stu26. NUS/AAM conference report, 1973

In September 1971 the National Union of Students, AAM and Committee for Freedom in Mozambique, Angola and Guiné set up a student network to coordinate student campaigning on Southern Africa. Every year through the 1970s and early 1980s the network held an annual conference to discuss campaign priorities. This is the report of the second conference, held at Aston University, Birmingham in July 1973. It was attended by 80 delegates representing 24 colleges. Student action concentrated on disinvestment from Southern Africa, fundraising for the liberation movements, campaigning for political prisoners and the cultural, academic, sports and consumer boycotts.

 
stu27. NUS/AAM programme of action, 1973

The 1973 NUS/AAM student network conference agreed a programme of action that concentrated on persuading universities to disinvest from companies involved in South Africa and raising material support for the Southern African liberation movements.

 
 
 
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