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int19a. Louis Mahoney interview clip

Louis Mahoney grew up in The Gambia and came to study medicine in Britain in the late 50's.He changed after a few years to train as an Actor. He has appeared in numerous theatre,film and television productions.In the 1970s and 80s he represented African-Asian members on the Council of Equity, the Actors union,becoming Vice President 1994-96.He founded Performers Against Racism to defend Equity policy on South Africa.

In this clip Louis talks about his involvement in setting up Performers Against Racism and his support of the cultural boycott of South Africa.

 
int19t. Louis Mahoney

Louis Mahoney grew up in The Gambia and came to study medicine in Britain in the late 50's.He changed after a few years to train as an Actor. He has appeared in numerous theatre,film and television productions.In the 1970s and 80s he represented African-Asian members on the Council of Equity, the Actors union,becoming Vice President 1994-96.He founded Performers Against Racism to defend Equity policy on South Africa.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the ‘Forward to Freedom’ AAM history project in 2013.

 
int19t. Louis Mahoney transcript

Louis Mahoney grew up in The Gambia and came to Britain in the 1950s. He has appeared in numerous theatre, film and television productions. In the 1980s he represented Afro-Asian members on the Council of Equity, the actors union and founded Performers Against Racism to defend Equity policy on South Africa.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the ‘Forward to Freedom’ AAM history project in 2013.

 
int20a. Patsy Robertson interview clip

Patsy Robertson grew up in Jamaica and came to Britain in the late 1950s. She joined the staff of the newly formed Commonwealth Secretariat in 1965 as its press officer. She was Director of Information and Official Spokesperson for the Commonwealth throughout the years when it played a central role in international opposition to apartheid.

In this clip Patsy Robertson describes the enormity of the task of ending apartheid.

 
int20t. Patsy Robertson transcript

Patsy Robertson grew up in Jamaica and came to Britain in the late 1950s. She joined the staff of the newly formed Commonwealth Secretariat in 1965 as its press officer. She was Director of Information and Official Spokesperson for the Commonwealth throughout the years when it played a central role in international opposition to apartheid.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out by Håkan Thörn in 2000.

 
int22t. Elaine Unterhalter transcript

Elaine Unterhalter was born in South Africa and became active in politics through the National Union of South African Students (NUSAS). She left South Africa in 1975 to study in the UK, and became involved in her local Anti-Apartheid group in Hackney, north London. She was a founding member of the AAM Women’s Committee in 1981 and remained one of its leading activists until the mid-1980s, when she began to work more directly with the ANC in exile.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the ‘Forward to Freedom’ AAM history project in 2013.

 
int22a. Elaine Unterhalter interview clip

Elaine Unterhalter was born in South Africa and became active in politics through the National Union of South African Students (NUSAS).  She left South Africa in 1975 to study in the UK, and became involved in her local Anti-Apartheid group in Hackney, north London.  She was a founding member of the AAM Women’s Committee in 1981 and remained one of its leading activists until the mid-1980s, when she began to work more directly with the ANC in exile.

In this clip she talks about the importance of the AAM Women's Committee.

 
int23a1. Joni McDougall interview clip 1

Joni McDougall became active in Camden Anti-Apartheid Group in 1984. She later worked full-time in the Anti-Apartheid Movement office for the Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust as organiser of the international conference on ‘Children & Apartheid’, held in Harare in 1987. In 1988 she joined the Nelson Mandela Freedom march as one of the 25 marchers who walked from Glasgow to London as part of the ‘Nelson Mandela: Freedom at 70’ campaign.

In this clip Joni MdDougall talks about fundraising and campaigning in Camden Town.

 
int23a2. Joni McDougall interview clip 2

Joni McDougall became active in Camden Anti-Apartheid Group in 1984. She later worked full-time in the Anti-Apartheid Movement office for the Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust as organiser of the international conference on ‘Children & Apartheid’,  held in Harare in 1987. In 1988 she joined the Nelson Mandela Freedom March as one of the 25 marchers who walked from Glasgow to London as part of the ‘Nelson Mandela: Freedom at 70’ campaign.

In this clip Joni McDougall talks about the Nelson Mandela Freedom March.

 
int23t. Joni McDougall transcript

Joni McDougall became active in Camden Anti-Apartheid Group in 1984. She later worked full-time in the Anti-Apartheid Movement office for the Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust as organiser of the international conference on ‘Children & Apartheid’, held in Harare in 1987. In 1988 she joined the Nelson Mandela Freedom March as one of the 25 marchers who walked from Glasgow to London as part of the ‘Nelson Mandela: Freedom at 70’ campaign.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the ‘Forward to Freedom’ AAM history project in 2013.

 
int26a. Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead interview clip

Glenys Kinnock became active in the Anti-Apartheid Movement as a student at Cardiff University. In the 1980s she spoke at numerous anti-apartheid meetings and conferences and played a central role in the ‘Children & Apartheid’ conference in Harare in 1987. She was MEP for Wales from 1994 to 2009 and served as Minister of State in the Foreign Office, 2009–10. She now sits in the House of Lords as Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead.

In this clip Glenys Kinnock describes how the testimony of children abused by the apartheid system, given at the conference in Harare, changed the way the world viewed apartheid South Africa.

 
int26t. Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead interview transcript

Glenys Kinnock became active in the Anti-Apartheid Movement as a student at Cardiff University. In the 1980s she spoke at numerous anti-apartheid meetings and conferences and played a central role in the ‘Children & Apartheid’ conference in Harare in 1987. She was MEP for Wales from 1994 to 2009 and served as Minister of State in the Foreign Office, 2009–10. She now sits in the House of Lords as Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the ‘Forward to Freedom’ AAM history project in 2013.

 
int33a. Gerard Omasta-Milsom

 

Gerard Omasta-Milsom joined the Anti-Apartheid Movement as a student at Bristol University, where he was an activist in Bristol University AA Group. In 1988 he joined the staff of the Anti-Apartheid Movement as Field Officer, responsible for coordinating the activities of local anti-apartheid groups. He became the AAM’s Campaigns Officer, remaining in post through the period when the AAM dissolved itself and set up a successor organisation, Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) in 1994–95.

In this clip Gerard describes the outreach work carried out in the 1980s and 90s with the AAM’s 1989 Boycott Bandwagon, converted the following year into the Freedom Bus.

 

 
int35t. David Blunkett transcript

David Blunkett is the Labour  MP for Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough. As Leader of Sheffield City Council in 1981 he launched a Declaration pledging that the Council would boycott South African goods, withhold use of sporting and recreational facilities from events involving South African participants and encourage positive teaching about Africa in Sheffield schools. In 1983 Sheffield Council hosted the inaugural meeting of Local Authority Action Against Apartheid.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of a project by students at Sheffield Hallam University in 2013.

 
int35a. David Blunkett interview clip

David Blunkett is the Labour  MP for Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough. As Leader of Sheffield City Council in 1981 he launched a Declaration pledging that the Council would boycott South African goods, withhold use of sporting and recreational facilities from events involving South African participants and encourage positive teaching about Africa in Sheffield schools. In 1983 Sheffield Council hosted the inaugural meeting of Local Authority Action Against Apartheid.

In this clip David Blunkett describes the link between combating racism in Sheffield and opposing apartheid in South Africa. 

 
 
int55t. Anne Page transcript

Anne Page lived in South Africa as a teenager and was recruited to the staff of the Anti-Apartheid Movement as Information Officer during the Rivonia trial in 1963–64. She helped organise the Trafalgar Square demonstration held on 14 June 1964 to demand clemency for Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. In 1965 she became the founding editor of the AAM’s monthly newspaper Anti-Apartheid News. As a councillor in the London Borough of Islington in the late 1970s, she was the first Chair of the council’s Race Relations Committee.

This is a complete transcript of an interview carried out as part of the Forward to Freedom history project in 2014.

 
int55a1. Anne Page interview clip

Anne Page lived in South Africa as a teenager and was recruited to the staff of the Anti-Apartheid Movement as Information Officer during the Rivonia trial in 1963–64. She helped organise the Trafalgar Square demonstration held on 14 June 1964 to demand clemency for Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. In 1965 she became the founding editor of the AAM’s monthly newspaper Anti-Apartheid News. As a councillor in the London Borough of Islington in the late 1970s, she was the first Chair of the council’s Race Relations Committee.

In this clip she tells how the Anti-Apartheid Movement distributed information about the accused in the Rivonia trial and campaigned for their release.

 
int55a1. Anne Page interview clip

Anne Page lived in South Africa as a teenager and was recruited to the staff of the Anti-Apartheid Movement as Information Officer during the Rivonia trial in 1963–64. She helped organise the Trafalgar Square demonstration held on 14 June 1964 to demand clemency for Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. In 1965 she became the founding editor of the AAM’s monthly newspaper Anti-Apartheid News. As a councillor in the London Borough of Islington in the late 1970s, she was the first Chair of the council’s Race Relations Committee.

In this clip she tells how the Anti-Apartheid Movement distributed information about the accused in the Rivonia trial and campaigned for their release.

 
int55a2. Anne Page interview clip

Anne Page lived in South Africa as a teenager and was recruited to the staff of the Anti-Apartheid Movement as Information Officer during the Rivonia trial in 1963–64. She helped organise the Trafalgar Square demonstration held on 14 June 1964 to demand clemency for Nelson Mandela and his co-accused. In 1965 she became the founding editor of the AAM’s monthly newspaper Anti-Apartheid News. As a councillor in the London Borough of Islington in the late 1970s, she was the first Chair of the council’s Race Relations Committee.

In this clip she describes how it was widely expected that Nelson Mandela and the other Rivonia trialists would be condemned to death.

 
 
 
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